TACTICAL MEDICAL COURSES

NAEMT's Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) teaches EMS practitioners and other prehospital providers how to respond to and care for patients in a civilian tactical environment. It is designed to decrease preventable deaths in a tactical situation. The course presents the three phases of tactical care:

  • Direct Threat Care that is rendered while under attack or in adverse conditions.
  • Indirect Threat Care that is rendered while the threat has been suppressed, but may resurface at any point.
  • Evacuation Care that is rendered while the casualty is being evacuated from the incident site.

Skill learned during this course include:

  • Hemorrhage control;
  • Surgical airway control and needle decompression;
  • Strategies for treating wounded responders in threatening environments;
  • Caring for pediatric patients; and
  • Techniques for dragging and carrying victims to safety.

NAEMT's TECC course meets the guidelines established by the Committee on TECC and the updated National Tactical Emergency Medical Support Competency Domains. This course is accredited by CAPCE and recognized by NREMT.

Tactical Combat Casualty Care – All Combatants is specific to non-medical personnel who are likely to be involved in a tactical situation are require training on how to handle medical emergencies from a tactical environment.

This TCCC course introduces evidence-based, life-saving techniques and strategies for providing the best trauma care on the battlefield. NAEMT conducts TCCC courses under the auspices of its PHTLS program, the recognized world leader in prehospital trauma education.

NAEMT’s TCCC courses use the PHTLS Military textbook and are fully compliant with the Department of Defense’s Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC) guidelines. It is the only TCCC course endorsed by the American College of Surgeons.

Almost 90% of American service men and women who die from combat wounds do so before they arrive at a medical treatment facility. This figure highlights the importance of the trauma care provided on the battlefield by combat medics, corpsmen, PJs, and even the casualties themselves and their fellow combatants. With respect to the actual care provided by combat medics on the battlefield, however, J. S Maughon noted in his paper in Military Medicine in 1970 that little had changed in the preceding 100 years. In the interval between the publication of Maughon's paper and the United States’ invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, there was also little progress made. The war years, though, have seen many lifesaving advances in battlefield trauma care pioneered by the Joint Trauma System and the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care. These advances have dramatically increased casualty survival. This is especially true when all members of combat units – not just medics - are trained in Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC).

Vigilant Medical Training has endless options and capabilities for conducting tactical medical training. For more information related to tactical medical training please contact luke@vigilantmedicaltraining.com

The TCCC course introduces evidence-based, life-saving techniques and strategies for providing the best trauma care on the battlefield. NAEMT conducts TCCC courses under the auspices of its PHTLS program, the recognized world leader in prehospital trauma education.

The Tactical Combat Casualty Care – Medical Provider (TCCC-MP) course is designed for combat EMS/military personnel, including medics, corpsmen, and pararescue personnel deploying in support of combat operations or responding to tactical situations stateside.

NAEMT’s TCCC courses use the PHTLS Military textbook and are fully compliant with the Department of Defense’s Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC) guidelines. It is the only TCCC course endorsed by the American College of Surgeons.

Almost 90% of American service men and women who die from combat wounds do so before they arrive at a medical treatment facility. This figure highlights the importance of the trauma care provided on the battlefield by combat medics, corpsmen, PJs, and even the casualties themselves and their fellow combatants. With respect to the actual care provided by combat medics on the battlefield, however, J. S Maughon noted in his paper in Military Medicine in 1970 that little had changed in the preceding 100 years. In the interval between the publication of Maughon's paper and the United States’ invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, there was also little progress made. The war years, though, have seen many lifesaving advances in battlefield trauma care pioneered by the Joint Trauma System and the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care. These advances have dramatically increased casualty survival. This is especially true when all members of combat units – not just medics - are trained in Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC).

NAEMT also offers Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) for civilian tactical EMS.